Air Maintenance welcomes graduates

Graduates from the Air Weapons Systems (AWS) Training course pose with their instructors. This graduation marks the first AWS on-type training completed at 4 Wing in over 10 years.  Cpl Maxime St-Cyr

Graduates from the Air Weapons Systems (AWS) Training course pose with their instructors. This graduation marks the first AWS on-type training completed at 4 Wing in over 10 years.
Cpl Maxime St-Cyr

Graduates from the Aviation System (AVN) and Aircraft Structures (ACS) training courses. Cpl Maxime St-Cyr

Graduates from the Aviation System (AVN) and Aircraft Structures (ACS) training courses.
Cpl Maxime St-Cyr

Sergeant Monica Matzner, Acting Warrant Officer 10 FTTS

Thursday the 6th of December 6, 2018 marked graduation day for the newest group of qualified technicians from 10 Field Technical Training Squadron (10 FTTS).

After months and years of training, studying and on the-job training, 12 Aviation System (AVN), 5 Aircraft Structures (ACS), and 4 Air Weapons Systems (AWS) technicians return to their home units at 4 Wing Cold Lake as qualified journeymen to begin work on the CF188 Hornet. This also marks the first AWS on-type graduates at 4 Wing in over 10 years.

The honour of top student was earned by Corporal Zachery Hunter for the AVN On-Type course and by Aviator Michael Richards for the AWS On-Type course, both from 410 Tactical Fighter (Operational Training) Squadron. This award is earned by achieving top marks in written and practical assessments, attitude, leadership and their ability to work as a team.

Lieutenant-Colonel Mark Hickey, Acting Wing Commander, merited the time during his speech to emphasize the importance of the Technicians Creed and to highlight the trust that every pilot places on our technicians every day.

Major Owens, 10 FTTS Commanding Officer, said “this is a key milestone for most individuals as they move-on from apprentices to journeymen. They are now authorized to work on the aircraft by themselves, however, the training doesn’t stop here, there’s still more to come, both formal and informal.” He added “The months and years of training revolve around one principal, the “Culture of Airworthiness”. Our biggest emphasis at the schools is to promote the airworthiness culture and to give students a sense of what’s right and what’s wrong. That’s our job in the air maintenance community to ensure that message is being passed down to our future technicians.”

10 FTTS has been upholding that culture since 1961 when they were stood up at 4 Wing, and trained technicians on the CF104 Starfighter, CF5 Freedom Fighter, CT133 Silver Star, and now the CF188 Hornet.

This achievements can only be done through collaborative efforts between military, public service members and contracted L3 instructors, our Defence Team.